Our History

The Center for Justice & Democracy was founded by consumer advocates in March 1998. Originally known as Citizens for Corporate Accountability and Individual Rights (CCAIR), the organization was formed with seed money from filmmaker Michael Moore and received a significant grant from the Stern Family Fund as a recipient of the Public Interest Pioneer award. An independent office for CJ&D was established in New York in 1999.

Over the past decade, CJ&D has grown into an organization of talented staff working in two different offices. CJ&D has released hundreds of studies, White Papers and fact sheets on civil justice issues, presented testimony before Congress and state legislatures, and helped organize countless press events advocating the rights of consumers and patients.

In 2011, CJ&D entered into an exciting partnership with New York Law School, and became known as the Center for Justice and Democracy at New York Law School.  One notable aspect of the partnership is CJ&D's two-semester project-based learning course at NYLS, called Civil Justice Through the Courts.  Students work on various projects, including researching and analyzing cutting-edge civil justice topics, preparing advocacy papers for CJ&D and the consumer rights community, and preparing policy papers for Congressional presentations.  

"We are looking forward to the numerous ways that our affiliation with CJ&D will stimulate us to think about the problems of civil justice and provide opportunities for our students to connect to lawyers in the field," said NYLS's Dean.  In addition to providing a wonderful opportunity for NYLS students, the collaboration will greatly enhance CJ&D's work furthering public appreciate for tort law and the civil justice system.

Through groundbreaking research and legal analysis, grassroots mobilization and effective advocacy, CJ&D is fighting to protect the civil justice system.

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The Center for Justice and Democracy (CJ&D) has a number of membership and contribution options.

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